Lesson 6 :: Nuts and Seeds

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This lesson puts the nut in nutrition—and the seeds, too! Rich in healthful fats, protein, vitamins, and minerals, nuts (such as almonds, walnuts, pistachios, and cashews) and seeds (such as sunflower, pumpkin, flax, and hemp) should play a key role in your diet. In fact, they can play many roles beyond snacking by the handful: I’ll teach you how to turn nuts and seeds into tasty granola, porridge, milks, butters, and pâtés.

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1        Nuts and Seeds      
2        Culinary Uses of Nuts and Seeds      
3        Lesson 6 Recipes      

 

Nuts and Seeds

Nuts and seeds are a healthful addition to any diet. Many people don’t realize how good they are to eat, both for taste and for nutrition. They are high in protein, fiber, B vitamins, vitamin E, and trace minerals such as magnesium, selenium, and zinc. They also have a low glycemic index (won’t spike your blood sugar) and contain heart-healthy monounsaturated and omega-3 fats.

 

The high calorie and fat content of nuts and seeds can be moderated by limiting portions to 1 ounce, or 1/4 cup, per day. 1/4 cup of most nuts and seeds contains about 200 calories. The amount you consume should depend on your metabolism and individual health condition. Some people will want to eat more than others. If you are a vegetarian, you will want to make them central to your diet.

 

A small percentage of people have nut allergies, and these are usually to peanuts (which aren’t really nuts, but legumes). Most people can tolerate seeds.

 

Nuts and seeds are most healthful when raw. Heating nuts damages their delicate nutrients, and unhealthful oils and salt are often added during the roasting process.

 

Since nuts and seeds have a high fat content, it is important to store them properly in order to protect them from becoming rancid. Storing nuts and seeds in tightly sealed containers in the refrigerator will protect them. They will keep for several months in the refrigerator, and for a year in the freezer.

 

In this lesson, you’ll learn about the most nutritious types of nuts and seeds, and how they can be used creatively as the basis for a variety of raw recipes, including cereals, milks, and pâtés. These recipes are vegetarian, dairy-free, and wheat-free. As with all foods, it is better to purchase organic nuts and seeds.

 

Soaking Nuts and Seeds

 

For increased enzyme activity and digestibility, soak nuts and seeds in water for several hours or overnight before using. Soaking raw nuts also makes them easier to process in your blender or food processor, which is important when creating nondairy milks and pâtés. Nuts and seeds that benefit most from soaking include almonds, walnuts, sunflower seeds, and pumpkin seeds. Almonds in particular are especially good to soak. (But you can, of course, eat them unsoaked.)

 

To soak nuts or seeds, put them in a mason jar. Fill with water, screw on the lid, and soak for 8 to 12 hours at room temperature or in a refrigerator. When you drain the nuts and seeds, rinse them and let them air-dry in the colander or strainer for a few minutes before storing them. This will help retain their crunchy texture and preserve them longer in the refrigerator. Unless you dry them, soaked nuts keep for 5 to 7 days; soaked seeds keep for 3 days (after that, they may turn a darker brown and taste a little bitter).

 

Types of Nuts

 

Almonds

  • Almonds are at the top of my list in recommended nuts, because they are so nutrient-rich. Almonds are a good source of vitamin E and magnesium. They are higher in protein than most other nuts: 1/4 cup contains 8 grams of protein.
  • They are lower in fat than most other nuts, and most of the fat they do have is heart-healthy monounsaturated fat.
  • For increased digestibility, soak almonds for 8 to 12 hours before eating them.

 

Brazil nuts

  • Brazil nuts are a delicious, creamy nut that makes a great snack or nut milk.
  • Like almonds, they are high in protein: 1/4 cup contains 8 grams of protein.
  • They are also the richest dietary source of selenium, a mineral that has antioxidant properties and also helps support the thyroid gland. Just one Brazil nut contains the recommended daily allowance of selenium.

 

Cashews

  • Cashews are high in antioxidants and lower in fat than most nuts. Most of their fat is heart-healthy mono-unsaturated fat.
  • With their slightly sweet taste, cashews make a great snack, nut butter, or addition to salads or stir-fries.
  • Some people can find them difficult to digest.
  • It is difficult to find truly raw cashews, because of the way they are processed. But it is possible to find them raw—you just have to look harder.

 

Pecans

  • Pecans are rich, buttery, and sweet, and popular in Southern American cuisine. They have a fantastic, unique taste, and I highly recommend them.
  • They are high in several vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, including vitamin E, beta-carotene, lutein, and zeaxanthin. Pecans also contain plant sterols, which may help lower cholesterol.

 

Pistachios

  • Pistachios are high in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, and fiber. They help lower cholesterol, and studies show they can help with male erectile dysfunction because they improve blood flow.
  • They have a delicate, slightly sweet flavor, and are commonly used in Middle Eastern cuisine.

 

Walnuts

  • Along with almonds, walnuts are among my most recommended nuts. Walnuts are an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids, which are very important for heart health. Walnuts also contain a variety of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory nutrients.
  • To remove the slightly bitter flavor of walnuts, soak them for 8 to 12 hours. Also, the fresher the walnuts, the sweeter they will be.
  • For a delicious treat, buy them in-shell in the fall, and crack them yourself.

 

Macadamia Nuts

  • Macadamia nuts are very rich in nutrients, high in healthy monounsaturated fat and protein with all essential amino acids, but they contain no cholesterol and are low in carbohydrate. They are a good source of calcium, potassium and fiber. This nut is definitely an energy-rich food.
  • They have a rich, buttery taste and make a delicious snack, dessert, or addition to a meal.  If you are a vegetarian you will want to eat these nuts.
  • As with all nuts, purchase them raw, unroasted, and unsalted.
  • Since macadamia nuts are high in fat, they are more prone to rancidity—make sure you purchase them fresh and store them in the refrigerator or freezer.

 

Types of Seeds

 

Sunflower Seeds

  • Sunflower seeds are a good source of nerve-calming magnesium, and an exceptional source of vitamin E, with 1/4 cup containing 60% of the recommended daily allowance. Vitamin E is an anti-inflammatory antioxidant, which helps reduce the risk of heart disease and can help ease menopause symptoms. Sunflower seeds also have more cholesterol-lowering phytosterols than any other nut or seed.
  • Sunflower seeds are not commonly allergenic, so nearly everyone can enjoy them.
  • Sunflower seeds are the principle ingredient in one of my favorite seed cheeses. Try this mild nutty-flavored seed as a snack or a garnish on green salads or hot cereals.

 

Sesame Seeds

  • Sesame seeds are high in copper, zinc, and lignans, a type of fiber that helps lower cholesterol. Sesame seeds are also a particularly rich source of calcium for vegetarians, with 1/4 cup containing 35% of the recommended daily allowance. Make sure to purchase unhulled seeds (the brown ones), since they contain the most calcium.
  • Sesame seeds add a delicate crunch to many dishes, including salads, vegetable side dishes, and grain pilafs. They are the main ingredient in tahini, a paste used in Middle Eastern dishes. They are also the principle ingredient in gomasio mix, which is used in Japanese cuisine. Gomasio is made with roasted sesames seeds, sea salt, and garlic. It can be sprinkled, adding zest and taste to almost any dish.

 

Pumpkin Seeds

  • Pumpkin seeds, also called pepitas, are available year-round but are freshest in the fall.
  • These green seeds are sweet and nutty, with a pleasing chewy texture.
  • Pumpkin seeds and pumpkin seed oil are thought to contain compounds which promote prostate health. Pumpkin seeds are also high in various minerals, including magnesium, manganese, iron, copper, and zinc. They are particularly high in protein, with 1/4 cup containing 10 grams.
  • Store these seeds for 1 to 2 months in the refrigerator, and use as you would sunflower seeds.

 

Amazing Omegas

Found in many fish, nuts, and seeds—among other sources—omega-3 fatty acids have numerous health benefits. They help decrease the inflammation that is also a factor in arthritis. They protect against heart disease, cancer, and diabetes, and help lower cholesterol. They also benefit women’s health, protecting against breast cancer, regulating estrogen levels, promoting normal ovulation, and decreasing symptoms of menopause. 

 

Flax Seeds

  • In addition to containing beneficial fiber, flax seeds are one of the richest sources of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), an omega-3 fatty acid. Just 1 tablespoon contains 100% of the recommended daily allowance. The body can convert ALA into EPA, the fatty acids found in fish. Therefore, flax seeds are a good alternative to fish and fish oils for vegans and vegetarians. If you are a vegetarian, you will want to include flax in your diet on a regular basis.
  • Flax seeds are golden or reddish brown, with hard, shiny shells.
  • Purchase them whole, then grind them in a coffee or seed grinder before using, since their nutrients are more absorbable when ground.
  • Sprinkle ground flax seeds onto salads or vegetables, or add them to smoothies.

 

Chia Seeds

  • Chia seeds are also a good source of omega-3 fats. Additionally, they are very high in fiber (2 tablespoons have 10 grams), and a good source of protein (2 tablespoons has 4 grams).
  • Unlike flax seeds, chia seeds do not need to be ground.
  • When combined with liquids, chia seeds develop a pleasing, tapioca-like texture, which thickens smoothies, porridges, and puddings. You also add them to oats and soak them overnight, and the mixture will be ready to eat in the morning for breakfast.

 

Hemp Seeds

  • Hemp seeds look a little like sesame seeds, and have a rich, nutty taste.
  • They don’t need to be ground, but can only be eaten de-shelled.
  • They can be sprinkled on salads, vegetables, and grains, and added to smoothies.
  • Hemp seeds are a great way to prevent constipation.
  • In addition to containing omega-3 fats, hemp seeds are very high in protein, at 8 grams per 2 tablespoons. They are easy to digest, and one of the few plant-based complete proteins, containing all 9 essential amino acids. Hemp protein powder is milled to remove the starch, and contains even more protein—10 grams per 2 tablespoons.
  • Hemp seeds are not commonly allergenic.

 

 

 

Culinary Uses of Nuts and Seeds

 

Nuts and seeds are most commonly eaten as snacks or additions to salads and smoothies. They can also be used in a variety of raw dishes, including cereals, milks, nut butters, and pâtés.

 

Ground Seed Mix

An easy way to eat a variety of nutritious seeds regularly is to grind several of them into a mix. Grinding seeds is another way, besides soaking, to make seeds easier to digest. You can store Ground Seed Mix in the refrigerator for up to 2 months, and keep it on hand to sprinkle onto salads, blend into smoothies, or make Multiseed Porridge (see the recipe later in this lesson). This way, you will be sure to add a daily boost of fiber, protein, and omega-3 fats to your diet. Here is the recipe:

 

Ground Seed Mix

Yield: 1 1/2 cups

 

  • 1/2 cup flax seeds
  • 1/4 cup sunflower, pumpkin, or sesame seeds
  • 1/4 cup chia seeds or hempseeds

 

Put the seeds in a coffee grinder and process into a fine powder (you may need to do this in two batches). Stored in a sealed container in the refrigerator, Ground Seed Mix will keep for 2 months.

 

Cereals

Cereal is America’s most popular breakfast food. Unfortunately, most boxed versions are made from grain, refined flour, and sugar and have little nutritional value. The following porridge recipe is a delicious alternative to grain-based cereals. If you have Ground Seed Mix on hand, you can make it in minutes. Try it for breakfast, or as a mid-morning or mid-afternoon snack.

 

Multiseed Porridge

Yield: 1 serving

 

  • 3 tablespoons Ground Seed Mix (see above)
  • Dash ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 cup Hemp Milk (preferably homemade—recipe follows in this lesson), plus additional for serving
  • 1/4 cup chopped or sliced fresh fruit, such as apple, banana, or berries (optional)

 

Put the Ground Seed Mix and cinnamon in a small bowl. Gradually add the Hemp Milk, and whisk to combine. Serve immediately with additional Hemp Milk and fresh fruit if desired.

 

Watch demonstrate of how to make both Ground Seed Mix and Multiseed Porridge.

https://vimeo.com/manage/209099914/general

 

 

Granola

Traditional granola combines oats, honey, oil, dried fruit, and nuts. Because of the honey and oil, it can be very high in sugar and fat.

 

Fortunately, you can make a raw granola out of nuts and seeds that contains no refined sugar or oil—yet it has just as much sweetness and crunch as the traditional cereal.

 

Make sure that you soak the nuts and seeds for this recipe. In addition to increasing enzymatic activity and digestibility, and lowering the calorie and fat content, soaked nuts and seeds are easier to process in the food processor.

 

Raw Nuts and Seed Granola

Yield: 1 cup (2 servings)

 

  • 1/4 cup soaked almonds
  • 1/4 cup soaked sunflower seeds or pumpkin seeds
  • 1/4 cup soaked walnuts or pecans
  • 1/4 cup raisins, chopped dates, or dried figs
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • Dash salt
  • 1/2 cup chopped or sliced fresh fruit (such as apple, banana, or berries)
  • 1/2 cup Almond Milk (recipe follows in this lesson)

 

Put the almonds, sunflower seeds, and walnuts in a food processor fitted with the S blade and pulse briefly, just until coarsely chopped. Add the dates, cinnamon, and salt, and process briefly to mix. Stored in a sealed container in the refrigerator, this Granola will keep for 2 days. When ready to serve, transfer to a small bowl and add the fresh fruit. Serve immediately with the Almond Milk.

 

Nut and Seed Milks

Homemade nut and seed milks are more nutritious than boxed nondairy versions (which usually contain added sugar), yet they take only minutes to make. Homemade nut and seed milks are unpasteurized, so the enzymes remain intact.

 

For almond milk, you’ll want to strain it to remove the pulp. Use a fine-mesh strainer or a mesh bag, also called a “nut milk bag,” which you can purchase online.

 

Almond Milk

Yield: 2 1/2 cups (4 servings)

 

  • 2 1/2 cups water
  • 1 1/2 cups soaked almonds
  • 3 pitted dates, soaked for 10 minutes in water and drained
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract (optional)

 

Put 1 1/2 cups of the water and all the almonds, dates, and optional vanilla in a blender. Process on high speed until smooth. Add the remaining 1 cup of water and process until very smooth.

 

Place a fine-mesh strainer over a large bowl and pour the almond mixture through it. Using a rubber spatula, stir and press the pulp that is caught in the strainer to extract as much milk as possible. Alternatively, use a mesh bag to strain the milk.

 

Discard the pulp left in the strainer. Transfer the milk to a sealed container and store in the refrigerator. Almond Milk will keep for 5 days. It tends to separate, so shake well before using.

 

Once you know how to make Almond Milk, you can make a variety of other nut and seed milks the same way. For example, to make Sesame Milk, replace the almonds with an equal quantity of soaked sesame seeds (with the hulls still on). To make Brazil Nut Milk, replace the almonds with an equal amount of soaked Brazil nuts. 

Watch this demonstrate for make nut and seed milks.

https://vimeo.com/manage/209099914/general

 

We’ve talked about how hemp seeds are a particularly nutritious seed, high in protein, fiber, and omega-3 fats. A delicious way to get the benefits of hemp is to turn it into a milk. Hemp milk is especially quick to make, as you don’t need to soak the seeds or strain the milk. Here’s the recipe:

 

Hemp Milk

Yield: 2 cups (4 servings)

 

  • 1 1/2 cups water
  • 1/2 cup hemp seeds
  • 3 pitted dates, soaked for 10 minutes in water and drained
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract (optional)

 

Put the water, hemp seeds, dates, and optional vanilla in a blender. Process on high speed until smooth. In a closed container in the refrigerator, Hemp Milk will keep for 5 days. It tends to separate, so shake well before using.

 

Nut Butters

The most common nut butter is probably peanut butter. However, peanuts are a legume, rather than a nut. While peanuts are high in protein and fiber, they do not contain as many minerals, such as calcium and vitamin E, as nuts do. Peanuts are common allergens for some people, so check before you consume it. Peanut butter can be purchased raw.

 

Other raw nut butters, such as almond butter, are great alternatives to peanut butter. Raw almond butter can be purchased at most natural food stores, but homemade is more economical and sometimes tastes better. When making this Almond Butter, use unsoaked nuts (otherwise the butter will be watery). Here’s how to make it:

 

Almond Butter

Yield: 3/4 cup

 

  • 1 cup almonds, unsoaked
  • Dash salt

 

Put the almonds and salt in a food processor fitted with the S blade, and process for 5 to 10 minutes, or until the almonds are ground into a paste. Stop occasionally to scrape down the work bowl with a rubber spatula. Stored in a sealed container in the refrigerator, Almond Butter will keep for 3 months.

 

Cashew Butter: Replace the almonds with an equal quantity of raw unsoaked cashews.

 

Note: Be careful not to consume too much nut butter.

It produces phlegm in the body, which is unhealthy.

 

Nut and Seed Pâtés

A pâté is a dip or spread made from raw, soaked nuts or seeds and other seasonings. Raw pâtés are versatile staples to make each week and keep on hand, since they last for 5 days in the refrigerator. With vegetable sticks, they make easy-to-transport snacks or light lunches. They make a great spread on crackers (I recommend non-wheat, gluten-free). They also make hearty additions to salads.

 

Not Tuna Pâté is one of my favorites—it’s delicious, versatile, filling, and familiar. To make Not Tuna Pâté, start with soaked almonds and sunflower seeds. Almond and sunflower seeds, when soaked and processed together, make a pleasing mix. The almonds become moist and fluffy, and the sunflower seeds become creamy—for the perfect “tuna salad”-like texture. The almonds and sunflower seeds also lose their individual distinctive tastes, to provide a blank canvas for the other added seasonings.

 

The seasonings—onion, parsley, celery, and lemon—are the same as for a traditional tuna salad. No one will miss the unhealthful mayonnaise-laden version. Here’s how to make it:

 

Not Tuna Pâté

Yield: 3/4 cup (2 servings)

 

  • 1/2 cup soaked sunflower seeds
  • 1/4 cup soaked almonds
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons minced celery
  • 1 tablespoon minced onion
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley

 

Put the sunflower seeds, almonds, water, lemon juice, and salt in a food processor fitted with the S blade and process into a paste. Stop occasionally to scrape down the work bowl with a rubber spatula. Transfer to a small bowl and stir in the celery, onion, and parsley. Mix well. Stored in a sealed container in the refrigerator, Not Tuna Pâté will keep for 5 days.

 

Not Salmon Pâté

Add 1/4 cup of shredded carrot to the food processor along with the almonds, sunflower seeds, water, lemon juice, and salt. Replace the parsley with 1 tablespoon of minced fresh dill or 1 teaspoon of dried dill weed.

 

Watch this demonstrate.

https://vimeo.com/209098067 

 

 

Here’s another pâté that’s even easier, since there is very little vegetable chopping involved. It’s light and delicately flavored. Serve it with a salad or as a dip with cut-up vegetable sticks. Or stuff it into a hollowed-out tomato or red bell pepper half for an easy lunch. Try the sun-dried tomato variation for a bright red color and Italian flavor.

 

Sunflower Herb Pâté

Yield: 3/4 cup, 4 servings

 

  • 1 cup soaked sunflower seeds
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon crushed garlic
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • Dash cayenne or ground pepper
  • 1 tablespoon minced red or green onion
  • 2 teaspoons minced fresh dill, basil, or parsley

 

Put the sunflower seeds, water, lemon juice, garlic, salt, and a little cayenne in a food processor fitted with the S blade and process into a paste. Stop occasionally to scrape down the work bowl with a rubber spatula. Transfer to a small bowl. Stir in the red onion and dill and mix well. Stored in a sealed container in the refrigerator, Sunflower Herb Pâté will keep for 5 days.

 

Sunflower Sun-Dried Tomato Pâté

Add 1/3 cup of soaked or oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes to the food processor along with the sunflower seeds, water, lemon juice, garlic, salt, and cayenne.

 

 

I hope this lesson encouraged you to use nutritious nuts and seeds for more than just snacking. They should be a central part of your diet. In the next two lessons, we’ll switch gears and learn about two nutritious cooked additions to the diet—whole grains and beans.

 


 

Lesson 6 Recipes

Ground Seed Mix

Yield: 1 1/2 cups

 

  • 1/2 cup flax seeds
  • 1/4 cup sunflower, pumpkin, or sesame seeds
  • 1/4 cup chia seeds or hempseeds

 

Put the seeds in a coffee grinder and process into a fine powder (you may need to do this in two batches). Stored in a sealed container in the refrigerator, Ground Seed Mix will keep for 2 months.

 

Multiseed Porridge

Yield: 1 serving

 

  • 3 tablespoons Ground Seed Mix (see above)
  • Dash ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 cup Hemp Milk (preferably homemade—recipe follows in this lesson), plus additional for serving
  • 1/4 cup chopped or sliced fresh fruit, such as apple, banana, or berries (optional)

 

Put the Ground Seed Mix and cinnamon in a small bowl. Gradually add the Hemp Milk, and whisk to combine. Serve immediately with additional Hemp Milk and fresh fruit if desired.

 

 

Raw Nuts and Seed Granola

Yield: 1 cup (2 servings)

 

  • 1/4 cup soaked almonds
  • 1/4 cup soaked sunflower seeds or pumpkin seeds
  • 1/4 cup soaked walnuts or pecans
  • 1/4 cup raisins, chopped dates, or dried figs
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • Dash salt
  • 1/2 cup chopped or sliced fresh fruit (such as apple, banana, or berries)
  • 1/2 cup Almond Milk (recipe follows in this lesson)

 

Put the almonds, sunflower seeds, and walnuts in a food processor fitted with the S blade and pulse briefly, just until coarsely chopped. Add the dates, cinnamon, and salt, and process briefly to mix. Stored in a sealed container in the refrigerator, this Granola will keep for 2 days. When ready to serve, transfer to a small bowl and add the fresh fruit. Serve immediately with the Almond Milk.

 

 

Almond Milk

Yield: 2 1/2 cups (4 servings)

 

  • 2 1/2 cups water
  • 1 1/2 cups soaked almonds
  • 3 pitted dates, soaked for 10 minutes in water and drained
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract (optional)

 

Put 1 1/2 cups of the water and all the almonds, dates, and optional vanilla in a blender. Process on high speed until smooth. Add the remaining 1 cup of water and process until very smooth.

 

Place a fine-mesh strainer over a large bowl and pour the almond mixture through it. Using a rubber spatula, stir and press the pulp that is caught in the strainer to extract as much milk as possible. Alternatively, use a mesh bag to strain the milk.

 

Discard the pulp left in the strainer. Transfer the milk to a sealed container and store in the refrigerator. Almond Milk will keep for 5 days. It tends to separate, so shake well before using.

 

Hemp Milk

Yield: 2 cups (4 servings)

 

  • 1 1/2 cups water
  • 1/2 cup hemp seeds
  • 3 pitted dates, soaked for 10 minutes in water and drained
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract (optional)

 

Put the water, hemp seeds, dates, and optional vanilla in a blender. Process on high speed until smooth. In a closed container in the refrigerator, Hemp Milk will keep for 5 days. It tends to separate, so shake well before using.

 

 

Almond Butter

Yield: 3/4 cup

 

  • 1 cup almonds, unsoaked
  • Dash salt

 

Put the almonds and salt in a food processor fitted with the S blade, and process for 5 to 10 minutes, or until the almonds are ground into a paste. Stop occasionally to scrape down the work bowl with a rubber spatula. Stored in a sealed container in the refrigerator, Almond Butter will keep for 3 months.

 

Not Tuna Pâté

Yield: 3/4 cup (2 servings)

 

  • 1/2 cup soaked sunflower seeds
  • 1/4 cup soaked almonds
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons minced celery
  • 1 tablespoon minced onion
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley

 

Put the sunflower seeds, almonds, water, lemon juice, and salt in a food processor fitted with the S blade and process into a paste. Stop occasionally to scrape down the work bowl with a rubber spatula. Transfer to a small bowl and stir in the celery, onion, and parsley. Mix well. Stored in a sealed container in the refrigerator, Not Tuna Pâté will keep for 5 days.

 

Sunflower Herb Pâté

Yield: 3/4 cup, 4 servings

 

  • 1 cup soaked sunflower seeds
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon crushed garlic
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • Dash cayenne or ground pepper
  • 1 tablespoon minced red or green onion
  • 2 teaspoons minced fresh dill, basil, or parsley

 

Put the sunflower seeds, water, lemon juice, garlic, salt, and a little cayenne in a food processor fitted with the S blade and process into a paste. Stop occasionally to scrape down the work bowl with a rubber spatula. Transfer to a small bowl. Stir in the red onion and dill and mix well. Stored in a sealed container in the refrigerator, Sunflower Herb Pâté will keep for 5 days.

 

Sunflower Sun-Dried Tomato Pâté

Add 1/3 cup of soaked or oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes to the food processor along with the sunflower seeds, water, lemon juice, garlic, salt, and cayenne.